Ancient

Books on Ancient Indian Coins


Felicitas : Essays in Numismatics Epigraphy and History in Honour of Joe Cribb Edited by Shailendra Bhandare and Sanjay Gargin Honour of Joe Cribb
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Felicitas : Essays in Numismatics Epigraphy and History in Honour of Joe Cribb Edited by Shailendra Bhandare and Sanjay Gargin Honour of Joe Cribb

Rs 2,200.00

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Contents: 1. Coinage, Prestige and Identity: From Rome to Persepolis and China/Michael Alram. 2. Linking the Past: Overstruck Coins and the Chronology of the Satavahanas/Shailendra Bhandare. 3. Kankali Tila and Kushan Chronology/Robert Bracey. 4. Fascination with the Past: Ancient Persia on the Coins and Banknotes of Iran/Vesta Sarkhosh Curtis.1 5. Reinterpretation of a Samatata Coin - The First Numismatic Depiction of Bodhisattva/Manjushri John S. Deyell. 6. A hoard of punch-marked coins from Mathura(?)/ Elizabeth Errington. 7. Ten thoughts on the Mathura Lion capital reliquary/Harry Falk. 8. Looking For Tyche: On the Tracks of a Syncretism from Greece to Gandhara/Christine Frohlich. 9. The Raj and the Rajas: a Tale of Numismatic Diplomacy/Sanjay Garg. 10. Minting Technology in Mughal India/Najaf Haider. 11. Aspects of Human Society from the earliest Punch-marked Coinages of the Indian Subcontinent/Terry Hardaker. 12. Coins and Commerce in Bihar in Seventeenth Century: Some Reflections/Syed Ejaz Hussain. 13. A Review of the Pagoda Coins of South East India during the Nayaka and Early Colonial Period/Barbara Mears. 14. Harasri: A New King of Ancient Almora/Wilfried Pieper. 15. Coins as History: Kuninda and Kota coins of Punjab/Himanshu Prabha Ray. 16. The Coinage of Samudra Pasai/Nicholas Rhodes and Vasilijs Mihailovs. 17. History of the Coin Collection of the Bengal Sultans in the British Museum/Sutapa Sinha. 19. The Crowns of Kanishka's Bronze Coins and Some Additional Shiva Images on Kushan Coins/Pankaj Tandon. 20. Onomastic, Title and Chronology of the Turgesh Kaghans/Francois Thierry. 21. Famous and Not-so-famous People Associated with the Royal Asiatic Society /Helen Wang. Contributors.

Joe Cribb, whom Felicitas seeks to honour, needs no introduction to any enthusiast of coins and paper money of Asia, specially of the Indian subcontinent. As a curator of South Asians Coins in the Department of Coins and Medals in the British Museum, and lately the Keeper of this department, Joe has had a ‘hand’ in a variety of numismatic activities.” Starting with Chinese coins, Joe moved to many other themes and subjects within the broader range of ‘Oriental’ numismatics and history, making invaluable contributions to highly controversial subject areas, like the inception of coinage in the Indian subcontinent and the chronological questions facing complex coinages in Central Asia. Significantly, Joe Cribb’s academic interests not just centre around the broad theme of ‘Money’, which encompasses numismatics, but also go much beyond.

Covering a vast time and space, the essays here deal with the most ancient of the sub-continental coinages as well as those that deal with the most modern and conventional forms of money, like banknotes. Among other specificities, the essays explore socio-historical themes associated with coinage, study iconography through coins, examine royal as well as religious coins icons seen on Kushan coins, offer fresh interpretation of the ‘Lion Pillar’ inscription from Mathura, and highlight the role/utility of coins in historical reconstruction from a conceptual perspective, analyzing the deployment of coins to underline archaeological and historical periods. Several other themes examined here include minting technology in Mughal India, pagoda coins of South East India, Kuninda and Kota coins of the Punjab, or how coins were used as a tool of diplomacy in the colonial India.

Shailendra Bhandare works as Assistant Keeper at the Heberden Coin Room, Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. He is also a member of faculty of Oriental Studies at the University of Oxford. Dr Sanjay Garg is the editor of Numismatic Digest the research journal of the Indian Institute of Research in Numismatic Studies.


A Dictionary of Numismatics Names by Albert R. Frey
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A Dictionary of Numismatics Names by Albert R. Frey

Rs 500.00

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Contents: Introduction. List of the Principal authorities cites. Abbreviations. 1. Dictionary. 2. Geographical index. 3. Paper money index.

"The purport of the present book is a twofold one. The beginner will find in it definitions of such terms as he will encounter during his perusal of numismatic works in both English and foreign languages. The advanced student and collector will have his labors facilitated by the large number of citations of authorities which have been consulted in the preparation of this volume. The author has frequently had the experience of discovering that the same coin is alluded to by one or more writers under entirely different names, and what is still more perplexing is the fact that these designations naturally fall far apart in any alphabetical arrangement.

The divisions and multiples of a standard are usually to be found under the name of the particular coin which constitutes the monetary unit; the only exceptions to this rule are where the larger or smaller denomination has so incorporated itself into numismatic history as to merit a separate description. Thus the terms Quarter Dollar, Medio Real, etc., are to be found under the substantive and not the adjective, whereas in the case of Tetradrachm. Quadrupla, etc., the opposite rule has been adopted, and these names are retained.

This is not a work on the metrology of coins, and weights are only introduced where they affect the name of a denomination due to its enlarged or reduced size. Many of the Oriental monetary systems are based on the weights and quantities of certain seeds, and to cite these moneys of account would exceed the scope of the present volume. The ancient Indian weights for gold and silver are described in detail by Prinsep, in his Useful Tables (i, 212); R.C. Temple has enumerated the Malayan weights in the Indian Antiquary (April, 1913); the Chinese metrology is treated by J.A. Decourdemanche, in the Traite des Monnaies, Mesures et Poids ancients et modernes de l’Inde et de la Chine, Paris, 1913; and the Greek and Roman standards comprise pages 222 to 225 inclusive of G.F. Hill’s Handbook of Greek and Roman Coins.

The popular slang names, as well as the unusual substances employed in coinage have been enumerated; these features, will be of special interest to the beginner.

The difficulties attending the execution of a work of this magnitude are enormous, hence, its imperfections will not, it is to be hoped, be judged too severely. A French author has said : "La numismatique est une maitresse dangereuse pour l’amateur, et toujours adoree, bien que cruelle, pour see fervents disciples;" and if the present volume will make the numismatic paths more accessible, and the stepping-stones somewhat easier, the writer will feel that his labor has not been in vain."


A Macro Study Of Early Indian Coins by C. Mani
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A Macro Study Of Early Indian Coins by C. Mani

Rs 800.00

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 "Study of coins mani coins why we study about coins coins of mani coins mani how to study indian coins view all the indian coins study about indian coins early indian coins study on indian coins."


A Study of Coins by O.N. Singh and D.P. Sharma
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A Study of Coins by O.N. Singh and D.P. Sharma

Rs 995.00

About the Book

Contents: Preface. Introduction. 1. Early coins of India. 2. Tribal coins of ancient India. 3. Indo-Greek coins. 4. Roman coins in India. 5. Kushana dynasty and their coins. 6. Satavahana coins. 7. Gupta coins. Bibliography. Index.

This book A Study of Coins covers Numismatic studies of South Asia from earliest time to modern period. The Ancient South Asian coinages have a very long and varied historical tradition providing a rich source of information. This part on Punch marked to Gupta Period will serve the needs of students and academicians, who want to study the coins from ancient to modern times. This is the first kind of study, which will highlights from the first Punch marked coins issued between 7-6 century BC to present era.

The present volume deals with manufacturing techniques, style and types of metals used symbols and images purpose and dynasties who promoted various kinds of coinage. This book contains seven chapters.


Ceylon Coins and Currency by H.W. Codrington
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Ceylon Coins and Currency by H.W. Codrington

Rs 2,000.00

About the Book 

Contents: 1. Metrology. 2. Ancient numismatics. 3. Ancient coins. 4. Roman (including Byzantine), Indo-Roman, and miscellaneous ancient. 5. Mediaeval Ceylon. 6. Mediaeval Ceylon (continued). 7. Mediaeval Indian. 8. Portuguese. 9. Dutch. 10. Dutch (continued). 11. British. 12. Muhammadan. 13. Miscellaneous, mediaeval and modern (far eastern, Venetian, Spanish, Spanish Netherlands, other European, Pagodas and Fanams). 14. Kandyan. Appendices: 1. Vinaya, commentaries, and other Pali and Sinhalese works. 2. Mahavamsa and Tika. 3. Works on metrology. 4. Inscriptions. 5. Documents relating to the Portuguese period. 6. Documents relating to the Dutch period. 7. Documents relating to the British period.

From the Introduction: "The only work dealing with Ceylon numismatics as a whole is Professor Rhys Davids' "Ancient Coins and Measures of Ceylon", published in 1877. This is now out of date, and, though papers on particular epochs have been published, notably by Messrs. J. Still and P.E. Pieris, in the Journal of the Ceylon Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society, the need of a work embracing the whole history of coinage and currency in the Island has long been felt. The present book is intended to supply this deficiency.

"Coins struck in or for use in the Island have been described fully, as have those found locally, unless already published, when the references have been given to the books or papers describing them.

"The appendices contain the principal documents on which my conclusions have been based.

"Coins purchased in Colombo are so noted, as it is possible that they may have been brought of recent years from India.


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