Miscellaneous

Books on all Subjects related to Numismatics


Numismatic Panorama : Essays in the Memory of Late Shri S.M. Shukla
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Numismatic Panorama : Essays in the Memory of Late Shri S.M. Shukla

Rs 2,000.00

About the Book:

Preface. Research papers: 1. On Indus seal: the unicorn/Kalpana S. Desai. 2. Two silver punchmarked coin hoards/Rehan Ahamad. 3. Punchmarked coin forgeries/T.R. Hardaker. 4. Relevance of numismatic approach to the study of Mathura/Aruna Sharma. 5. More than one king named Satavahana: an examination/Amiteshwar Jha. 6. Mahakhatapa Vasithiputa Isamahisa/Ajay Mitra Shastri. 7. A coin of Siva Satakarni/P.D. Chumble. 8. The circulation of Satavahana coins in Tamilnadu/Michael Mitchiner. 9. Kushana silver coins/P.L. Gupta. 10. Iconic forms of Siva on Kushana coins/B.N. Mukherjee. 11. Ancient mint at Rohtak/Manmohan Kumar. 12. Roman and Byzantine copper coins/P.V. Radhakrishnan. 13. Abheraka: the earliest western Kshatrapa/Dilip Rajgor. 14. A new western Kshatrapa identified?/R.C. Senior. 15. Kshatrapa coin hoard from Ghantasala/V.V. Krishna Sastry. 16. Ikshvaku coins/M. Veerender. 17. Fire altar type coins of Skandagupta: towards a typological and chronological definition/K.K. Maheshwari and Biswajeet Rath. 18. Shri Ram Kashyap Gotrins/G. Kamalakar. 19. Chemical analysis and metallographic study of South Indian gold coins/V. Pandit Rao and B. Naga Padma. 20. Tin as an element of coinage/M.C. Ganorkar. 21. Unpublished copper coins of early medieval Gujarat/Dhiren Gala and Girish Vira. 22. A new coin of Iltutmish/Al Sayyed and Nicholas Rhodes. 23. Animal motif on the coins of Islam Shah: a note/Danish Moin. 24. Chinese coin finds from South India and Sri Lanka/Joe Cribb. 25. Some interesting coins of Akbar/J.R. Hunnargikar. 26. Some observations on Jehangir's Ilahi rupees from Agra/Jan Lingen. 27. Parodies on Mughal coin couplets/Sanjay Garg. 28. Coins of the Nizam Shahi Sultanate of Ahmednagar/Aravind S. Athavale. 29. A new Holkar coin/Sajid Naim and Dilip P. Balsekar. 30. The acquisition of Indian mints by the English East India Company/K.W. Wiggins. 31. Tea garden tokens of Assam/S.K. Bose. 32. Reminiscence of Palanpur coins/P.J. Surana.

 

 


Numismatic Gleanings by Devendra Handa and M. K. Gupta
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Numismatic Gleanings by Devendra Handa and M. K. Gupta

Rs 1,950.00

About the Book:

Preface. 1. Minuscule copper punch marked coins from Vidisha. 2. Some uniface cast copper and Hathodaka coins. 3. An interesting central Indian silver coin. 4. Some interesting Eran Ujjayini coins. 5. A new Kausambi coin. 6. An early Indian indigenous gold coin. 7. An interesting un inscribed coin showing cow suckling the calf. 8. Some interesting Mitra coins. 9. Two unpublished copper coins of Vidisa. 10. Copper coin with a new symbol. 11. An interesting coin of Nahapana. 12. Some bull/hill type coins of Rudrasimha I. 13. Bronze coin of Vasishthiputra Chhimuka. 14. Some new coins of King Satakarni. 15. An interesting lion type coin of Satakarni. 16. An interesting counter struck Satavahan coin. 17. A gold signet ring. 18. Srivatsa type copper coins of King Sata. 19. Machala dogs of Vidarbha. 20. Two interesting Maharathi coins. 21. Some Kushana imitations from Central India. 22. Clay sealings of Dhanadeva. 23. Some more clay seals and sealings from Sunet. 24. Some more Vishnukundin type inscribed coins. 25. Some more Kalachuri coins. 26. Three new and interesting coins from Ujjain region. 27. A silver coin of Paramara King Udayaditya. 28. An unpublished hoard of Indo-Sassanian silver coins from Burhanpur. 29. Some interesting Paramara and Yadava type silver coins. 30. An enigmatic mintless Darb of Akbar. 31. An obverse die of Akbar's rupee. 32. A lead coin with erotic scene. 33. A tetra lingual silver seal of Nabha. Select bibliography. Index.

The present work contains thirty-three articles of the authors on some unique, interesting and significant coins and sigils which throw flashes of light on various aspects of the history, culture, religion, art, economy, trade and commerce, science and technology of the people of India in different periods of its long history. It is for the first time that minuscule copper punch-marked coins from Vidisha have been brought to light which acquaint us of the local economy during the later half of the first millennium BCE. The uniface cast copper coins collected from eastern Malwa and Khandesh region establish relationship of the area with the Deccan which has yielded similar coins. Coins of the city-state of Hathodaka indicate the role the city-states played in the development of trade and commerce in the Narmada valley during the early centuries before the commencement of the Common Era. The silver and copper coins from Eran-Ujjayin region indicate the continued use of the white metal and corroborate the popularity of Vaishavism in central India evidenced earlier by the discovery of an elliptical temple plan and the Garuda-dhvaja pillar inscription at Vidisha.

The indigenous gold coin confirms the use of this valuable metal for indigenous coinage before the Kushanas. Another coin takes back the antiquity of the auspicious Hindu mythological art-motif of cow suckling the calf to circa third-second century BCE. New Mitra and Satavahana coins add to our existing knowledge by bits while Kalachuri and inscribed Vishnukundin type coins betray the existence of the scions of these dynasties or their allies in central India. Indo-Sassanian, Paramara and Yadava type coins from the region reveal the political developments of the medieval period while a piece with erotic theme tells of the use of a hitherto unknown motif. The Darb of Akbar betrays the erring human nature and a coin-die of the emperor confirms the existence of a mint-town. The tetra-lingual silver seal of Nabha bears evidence to the use and popularity of various languages in the Malwa region of Punjab and the secular outlook of its rulers. All the articles thus help us in our understanding of our history in a better way to enlighten our future course.

 

 


The Copper Coins of India by W.H Valentine
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The Copper Coins of India by W.H Valentine

Rs 300.00

 

 About the Book:

Reprint Edition 2014 , pages 272, maps 4,royal 4vo, Paperback.

Including Bangladesh, Burma, Nepal and Pakistan (in 2 Parts Bound in 1)

The varied types used on the coins, the larger sized dies and the different alphabetic signs and languages present an apparently endless series of puzzles. The object of this work, is to help the collector solve some of these fascinating problems' and assist him in arranging his Indian coins in a methodical manner.

The plan followed is a geographical one, encompassing India and her neighbours - East Pakistan (presently Bangladesh), BUrma (presently Myanmar), Nepal and Pakistan. A drawing of each coin is accompanied by its description, its transcription and transliteration. Every available source, including several private collections have been consulted. A brief sketch of Indian history, the Hindustani and Persian alphabet and numerals and a glossary of words provide relevant background information.

Coin lovers the world over would appreciate this work wich will effectively serve the practical needs of those possessing Indian copper coins.

 


Foreign Coins Found in the Indian Subcontinent : 8 - 10 January, 1995, 4 International Colloquium Edited by David W. MacDowall and Amiteshwar Jha
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Foreign Coins Found in the Indian Subcontinent : 8 - 10 January, 1995, 4 International Colloquium Edited by David W. MacDowall and Amiteshwar Jha

Rs 700.00

About the Book:

Contents: Presidential address. Some aspects of foreign coins in the Indian subcontinent/B.N. Mukherjee. Keynote address: Foreign coins found in India: In view of the monetary systems operating in the countries of their origin/David W. MacDowall. The interpretation of foreign coins found in southernmost India/Michael Mitchiner. The impact of early foreign coins on Indian minting technique and metrology.B.N. Mukherjee. Ancient Greek Coins from Karur/R. Krishnamurthy. The Indo-Roman metal trade/David W.MacDowall. Some aspects of Roman coins in India/Ajay Mitra Shastri. Evidence of die-links of Roman coins and their Indian imitations found in India/Peter Berghaus. The circulation of foreign coins in Southern India/T. Satyamurthy. Roman coin finds in the karimnagar region of Andhra/V.V. Krishna Sastry. Roman currency in Gujarat/Dilip Rajgor. Roman silver coins in the national museum, New Delhi/Pratipal Bhatia. A solidus of constantine the great from Gujarat/Lance Dame. Scientific study of Roman coins found in India/M.C. Ganorkar, V. Pandit Rao and P. Gayathri. Satavahana monetary system - an outline/Amiteshwar Jha. Chinese coins found in India/Parmeshwar Lal Gupta. Three Hoards of Chinese coins from Tanjavur/Yao Shoumin. The venetian ducat in India/Alan M. Stahl. 39 venetia ducats from Sultanpur, Gulbarga Dt., Karnataka/R. Gopal. Venetian gold flow to India/Sanjay Garg. Foreign coins in traditional jewelleryof the deccan/Sahilendra U. Bhandare. Foreign coins and imitations used for ornamentation/Chandrashekhar Gupta. The survival of foreign coin names in Indian Epigraphy and Literature/Biswajeet Rath. Foreign coins in Gujarat: a study of travellers' accounts in the 17 century/Ruby Maloni and Nurusabha Amin.

From the Introduction: "This volume contains the wide range of interesting communications submitted to the seminar, sometimes revised in the light of the lively discussions that ensued. In his presidential address Prof. B.N. Mukherjee draws attention to some of the literary and epigraphic data available about foreign coins imported into India. In earlier times they arrived with traders, travellers or pilgrims. They also served as bullion. At times they influenced manufacturing techniques and metrology. Some of their devices came to be used on indigenous coinage.

The important distinction is drawn between foreign coins that represent the casual loss of small change and major trade currencies. There are briefing papers on the character of the Roman and Venetian monetary systems and the factors that may explain why some coins rather than others were chosen for export as part of the bullion trade.

The ancient Greek copper coins found in the riverbed at Karur came mostly from eastern Mediterranean mints. In western India there are echoes of foreign trade in inscriptions mentioning Yavanas (foreign traders) at Karle and the Greek forms of centaurs and the four-horsed chariot of the sun at Bhaja. Foreign coin names, such as the Greek drachm and Roman dinar, long survived in Indian epigraphy".

 

 


Gold Coins in the Collection of the Asiatic Society Edited by Sutapa Sinha
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Gold Coins in the Collection of the Asiatic Society Edited by Sutapa Sinha

Rs 2,500.00

Gold Coins in the Collection of the Asiatic Society

Edited by Sutapa Sinha, The Asiatic Society, 2010, xiv, 138 p, 114 b/w plates
 

Contents: Foreword. Preface. Acknowledgement. 1. Introduction. 2. Descriptive catalogue of gold coins: i. Non-Islamic Indian coins. ii. Islamic Indian coins. iii. Foreign coins. iv. Unattributed Gold pieces. Index.

"The present catalogue is a classified catalogue of the gold coins now preserved in the Society's cabinet. Most of these are pagodas and fanams of South India, presumably collected from Tipu Sultan's Treasury long ago. There are also two Kushana gold-coins of the Third Century A.D., Indo-British Star Pagodas, Afghan-Durrani Coins, a few Ottoman gold coins. Venetian Gold Ducats, of Malay, and a few "unattributed" pieces. The variety is numismatically important.

This catalogue has been prepared by the Late Dr. Rita Sharma with meticulous care, and competently edited by Dr. Sutapa Sinha. The illustrated catalogue would certainly be useful to the students of Numismatics and History, and would be appreciated by the general readers."


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